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Start Date

3-5-2022 9:30 AM

End Date

3-5-2022 9:45 AM

Description

The secular city is constituted by fragmentations — splintered, painful divides between people groups and a variety of conflicts within them. While ethnic, cultural and generational differences explain some of these, other powerful differences sediment those and other divisions such that unwillingness to associate with those who are different is only further exacerbated. All of this prevents ministry in the times and situations when it is most needed. Sadly, because the church has often been complicit in cultivating some of the existing divisions, few people believe we can help. Yet, our own theological heritage offers abundant resources for bridging relationships, even if ideological or cultural divides can never be fully overcome on this side of the eschaton. This presentation will discuss how social divisions beyond those of ethnicity, culture and generation continue to divide and polarize us. It will then proceed to discuss ministerial approaches toward healing these divisions through the slow and patient work that is characteristic of following the Lord’s lead. This presentation will achieve this goal by recommending a theological foundation for approaching endeavors to bridge relationships, and then drawing upon a variety of resources in social science and psychology to give practical advice for living confidently with our neighbors in a pluralistic culture, seeking a more common good for all through love of neighbor.

Submission Type

Bible Study; Lecture; Sermon Prep

Submission Audience

Laity; Ministers; Scholars

Submission Cost

Free

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May 3rd, 9:30 AM May 3rd, 9:45 AM

Bridging Social Divides in the Secular City: A Theological Approach

The secular city is constituted by fragmentations — splintered, painful divides between people groups and a variety of conflicts within them. While ethnic, cultural and generational differences explain some of these, other powerful differences sediment those and other divisions such that unwillingness to associate with those who are different is only further exacerbated. All of this prevents ministry in the times and situations when it is most needed. Sadly, because the church has often been complicit in cultivating some of the existing divisions, few people believe we can help. Yet, our own theological heritage offers abundant resources for bridging relationships, even if ideological or cultural divides can never be fully overcome on this side of the eschaton. This presentation will discuss how social divisions beyond those of ethnicity, culture and generation continue to divide and polarize us. It will then proceed to discuss ministerial approaches toward healing these divisions through the slow and patient work that is characteristic of following the Lord’s lead. This presentation will achieve this goal by recommending a theological foundation for approaching endeavors to bridge relationships, and then drawing upon a variety of resources in social science and psychology to give practical advice for living confidently with our neighbors in a pluralistic culture, seeking a more common good for all through love of neighbor.