Date of Award

5-20-2022

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Doctor of Ministry (DMin)

Department

Practical Theology

First Advisor

Joel Biermann

Scripture References in this Resource

Genesis 1; Genesis 2; Genesis 2:24; Genesis 3; Genesis 3:14–15; Matthew 5:17; Leviticus 19:18; Matthew 19:19; Matthew 22:39; Mark 12:31; Luke 10:27; Romans 13:9; Galatians 5:14; James 2:8; Philippians 2:5–11

Abstract

Instances of moral failure within the U.S. Army raises the question of whether an individual’s character may be developed and improved by utilizing a moral decision-making process. If so, is it possible to measure this improvement? From a Lutheran perspective, is it possible to improve moral character without appealing to the boundaries provided by God’s Word and a Christian community influencing the spiritual dimensions of one’s life.

This project set out to build upon an eighteen-hour Transformational Moral Leadership training model being utilized to strengthen the moral character of drill sergeants at Fort Benning, Georgia. The project allowed me as a chaplain to teach God’s plan for life in the areas of finances, relationships, and vocation, while only utilizing the boundaries provided by the predominately secular community of the U.S. Army. To measure the effectiveness of character development training within a secular environment I utilized both a quantitative survey and qualitative interview process. The evidence and data gathered during this project strongly suggest it is not possible to improve moral character without appealing to the boundaries provided by God’s Word and a Christian community. The implication of my research is that moral development training will be most effective within a military chapel or civilian parish setting.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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